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Vol. 23. Issue 2.
Pages 77-186 (01 March 2019)
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Vol. 23. Issue 2.
Pages 77-186 (01 March 2019)
Original Research
DOI: 10.1016/j.bjpt.2019.01.005
Does low and heavy load resistance training affect musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese women? Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial
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Anne Mette Rustadena,
Corresponding author
anne.rustaden@inn.no

Corresponding author at: Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, P.O. Box 4014, Ullevål Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway.
, Lene Annette Hagen Haakstada, Gøran Paulsenb, Kari Bøa
a Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, Oslo, Norway
b The Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sport, Oslo, Norway
Highlights

  • Twelve weeks of BodyPump (low load resistance training) and heavy load resistance training with and without a personal trainer did not show any between group effects on self-reported musculoskeletal pain in overweight women.

  • High (≥75%) versus low (≤75%) exercise adherence do not affect the prevalence of bodily pain after 12 weeks of resistance training.

  • We need more studies evaluating changes in musculoskeletal pain during popular exercise concepts.

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Tables (5)
Table 1. Exercise program BodyPump.
Table 2. Demographic data of the participants in the BodyPump group (BP), personal trainer group (PT), non-supervised group (NS) and control group (C).
Table 3. Self-reported musculoskeletal pain at baseline and post-test in the BodyPump group (BP), personal trainer group (PT), non-supervised group (NS) and control group (C). Differences between the groups analyzed with chi-square test, presented with p-value. Presented as numbers reporting pain (n)/of the total number of participants (n) in each group, and as percent (%).
Table 4. The number of participants that reported musculoskeletal pain in the different body parts at baseline and post-test, with the three intervention groups collapsed. Reported as number participants reporting pain (n)/total number of participants (n), and percent (%). Differences from baseline to post-test, analyzed with McNemar's test are presented with p-value, and percent group differences (%) estimated with a 95% Wald confidence interval with Bonett–Price adjustment.
Table 5. Differences in self-reported musculoskeletal pain (yes/no) and high (≥75%) versus low (≤75%) exercise adherence. Analyzed with chi-square test, and presented with p-value. Differences between the groups estimated with a 95% Wald confidence interval with Bonett–Price adjustment, presented with percent % and 95% CI.
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Abstract
Background

Overweight and obesity are associated with musculoskeletal pain, particularly in the female population. However, regular resistance training may positively affect these complaints.

Objective

The present study aimed to investigate between group differences in musculoskeletal pain in previously inactive women, allocated to three different resistance-training modalities available in health- and fitness clubs.

Methods

This is secondary analysis from a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, including healthy women (aged 18–65) with a BMI (kg/m2) ≥25. The participants were allocated to 12 weeks (3 times/weekly) of either BodyPump (high-repetition low-load group session) (n=24), heavy load resistance training with a personal trainer (n=28), non-supervised heavy load resistance training (n=19) or non-exercising controls (n=21). Primary outcome was self-reported musculoskeletal pain in ten different body parts, measured with the Standardized Nordic Pain Questionnaire, at baseline and post-test. In addition, the study included sub-analyses of the participants when they were divided into high (≥28 of 36 sessions, n=38) and low (≤27 of 36 sessions, n=22) exercise adherence.

Results

The analysis revealed no between group differences in musculoskeletal pain in any of the ten body parts. The results did not change when the participants were divided into high versus low adherence.

Conclusions

Twelve weeks of BodyPump, heavy load resistance training with a personal trainer and non-supervised heavy load resistance training did not show any effect on self-reported musculoskeletal pain in overweight women.

Clinical Trial registration number: NCT01993953.

(https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01993953).

Keywords:
Strength training
Group exercise
Personal trainer
Obesity
Pain

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